And now about another type of online gaming

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It’s the year 2014, when online gaming is normal. People play first person shooters, strategy games, massively multiplayer role playing games, hell, even farming simulators through the internet, and it’s normal. The internet is a local area network of the whole planet, and gamers can connect to fellow gamers from half a world away. Nowadays these things are usual.

There is another form of online gaming, though – a form that nobody seems to consider gaming, probably because there is real money involved, and players need less skill, and more luck to win. It’s called online gambling.

You see, online games come and go. Every major MMO, online strategy title and FPS will be forgotten in a few years, while casino classics like blackjack and roulette will still be among the players’ preferences. Poker is one of the most popular online games, even with real money involved – the world’s biggest online poker room has over 50 million registered users from all over the world, and over 100 billion poker hands have been dealt through it since its launch in 2001.

Online casino gaming is also a popular form of online gambling. Millions of people from all over the world are playing at various online casinos, like the Euro Palace Online Casino, the 888.com online casino, the Jackpot City or the Casino.com, to name just a few. Some operators even combine various forms of online gambling, offering their players the chance to bet on various sports events (this one I hardly consider gaming at all) and play a hand of poker, a spin at the slot machines, a round of blackjack or even some ‘casino darts’ (this one was a shock for me!) while waiting for the event to end. These operators are among the biggest in Europe, most of them with a long history in sports betting.

So, what games can you play at online casinos?

First of all, there are the classics: roulette, blackjack, craps, baccarat and other card and table games. These are all considered traditional casino games, and are present in real life establishments as well. Some of them are centuries old, others are new versions of old games re-invented (and patented, of course) by modern day casino operators.

Another big game category – perheaps the one with the greatest variety – is slot machines. This invention is also over a century old, but it couldn’t reach its full potential until the late 1970s, when the first video slot machine was built. Since then these games have become available in hundreds, if not thousands of varieties – some are replicas of classic Las Vegas slot machines, others are inventive and surprising pieces of software built entirely for computer screens.

To have a complete casino offer, developers usually include in their offer other forms of casino games, sometimes called ‘parlor games’ – video poker, scratch cards, various casual games, keno and bingo.

Online casinos are popular for two reasons: their variety of games and the chance of winning. Some people gamble for fun, others try to gain some extra income by playing these games. For some casino gaming is like a job, for others it’s a form of entertainment that can eventually mean some extra beer money…

Games to Look Forward to in 2014

2013 was definitely a magnificent year for the gamers of the world. Next level games such as Battlefield 4, Grand Theft Auto V, The Last of Us and Assassin’s Creed IV: Black Flag, to name a few, had all the different types of gamers jumping up and down in pure ecstasy. With a year that had so much to offer, one might fear that 2014 might struggle to keep the hype and excitement alive. At the start of each new year, gamers come together, looking around nervously, wondering just what next generation game they will be able to sink their teeth into. It’s always a gamble, like on some https://www.jackgold.com/p/mobile-slots website, as to whether a game will live up to the hype, but luckily, it seems that the future looks promising. Here are three games I’m looking most forward to for 2014.

The Elder Scrolls: Online

Release date: 4 April (June for consoles)

If you’ve played any of the Elder Scrolls games, there is no need for me to remind you why this is one of the most anticipated games of 2014. Set in the same world as the previous instalments, but a thousand years before the adventures of Skyrim, this open world game moves away from the single player mode and into the thrilling territories of online. This brings about a whole new dimension in the form of PvP combat, granted you don’t take an arrow to the knee.

South Park: The Stick of Truth

Release date: 4 March

As an avid fan of South Park, and anything Trey Parker and Matt Stone are involved in writing, you can imagine my excitement when I discovered that the hilarious duo would actually be writing the game too. My excitement reached a whole new level when I realised Obsidian Entertainment (creators of Fallout: New Vegas) would take the developer’s seat. Get ready for some fun shenanigans, South Park style!

Tom Clancy’s The Division

Release date: End of 2014

As a complete sucker for both third-person tactical shooter games as well as mass multiplayer role-playing games, when I read about The Division, which combines both formats, I could hardly contain my excitement. When a deadly pandemic hits, leaving the world battered and chaotic, it is up to the Strategic Homeland Division to pick up the pieces and save whatever remains, no matter the cost. This epic MMORPG will see players come face-to-face with AI, friends and other players.

By Jason Swindon

Video games affect your dreams

If you’re a serious gamer, you know that repeated play has an impact on you in many ways. It clearly affects your sensory perception, but now there are studies suggesting that it affects your dreams as well.

Net neutrality issues will affect gamers

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At first glance one wouldn’t necessarily think of hard core gamers as politically aware, but that’s been changing recently as issues like SOPA and the NSA have grabbed the attention of young people who view the Internet as an integral part of their lives. If you think about who would be most upset by having to pay more for Internet speeds we’ve come to expect, or to not have that speed when accessing sites that don’t have preferred status on their ISP, then it would be hard core gamers who would go nutz if their gaming experience was threatened. So the recent ruling on net neutrality will likely spark some serious interest from gamers when they realize that their lifestyle is one of those most threatened by the latest ruling that sets back net neutrality.

Of course this won’t affect just serious gamers. Anyone who loves online video and streaming content will likely be affected. Even casual gamers looking for a game of chess online or are searching William Hill bingo bonus 2013 will be irritated if the game slows down. And we really don’t know yet how serious this problem can become, and whether it will even be perceptable to the average person. Will a slight delay in chess or bingo get people upset? Again, it depends on what one defines as “slight” and how radical the ISPs get in forcing sites to pay up for easy access.

But when it comes to gamers, nothing short of instant reaction will be acceptable, so the political and commercial fallout might be quick. From a business point of view, it seems that there are lower margin ISPs who can win some serious business attacking the big boys and marketing a net neutral service. Of course this carries risk, as the bandwidth sucked up by new customers might really hurt margins, but there still might be a great business there playing volumes over margins.

The biggest problem may be with innovation, as startups and new gaming companies won’t have the funds to pay up for smooth Internet access.

The entire web experience will potentiall be threatened if net neutrality becomes a thing of the past. If people are going to stop this, it’s safe to expect gamers to be among those leading the charge.

Play online poker and other games in New Jersey

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New Jersey has been in the news quite a bit lately, as we’re seeing the underbelly of one of the most corrupt states in the country. Louisiana is another, but there’s something about New Jersey strong-arm tactics that set it apart.

Still, there’s plenty to like about New Jersey politicians as well, particularly when they tell the politically correct suits in Washington to go to hell. There’s been all sorts of controversy through the years as the feds tried to stop people from enjoying themselves by playing poker and other games online. Then we had a court explain that federal law didn’t cover games of skill like poker, and now we have a bunch of states led by New Jersey making it clear that they’d like to control how people entertain themselves in their state. The state of New Jersey is now allowing its citizens and people in their state to play online.

The latest news has Richard Branson’s Virgin Group getting involved as they have teamed with the Tropicana Resort in Atlantic City and online game maker Gamesys. They will offer online poker, blackjack and slots this week. The state hopes to bring in $1 billion in casino revenues this year by imposing a 17% tax. Finally, something that makes sense.

Of course people have been playing for years and this industry is growing like crazy. Everyone accepts online poker as a new and fun form of entertainment, and many new poker champions started by playing online. There are tons of poker sites for American players and there always will be, but now we have states getting in on the act and that should make things even better for consumers.

Hopefully, this push from the states will finally get Congress to adapt consistent rules and regulations, or at least make it even easier for states to innovate. Poker has become such a popular game and it seems silly to deny people the right to enjoy it in their pajamas. Sure, real casinos are fun, but sometimes staying home and playing on your own is even better.

Classic hockey game from “Swingers”

“I’m going to make Wayne Gretzky’s head bleed for Superfan number 99 over here.” That’s the classic quote from Trent in “Swingers” as he taunts his friend Sue as they play hockey on the Sega Genesis. It’s one of the great scenes from this amazing movie and probably offers one of the best summaries of gaming in the 90s. Grantland just posted this great oral history of the making of the film and they discussed the making of this scene.

Ludwig: Wayne Gretzky’s head bleeding was the hardest thing to shoot in the whole movie. We finished up and we had the camera for another 72 hours before we had to return it. So we had to shoot an insert of a TV screen where one of them makes Wayne Gretzky’s head bleed. We’re in the editing room with the TV set and we’re playing that game and the editor can’t make Wayne Gretzky’s head bleed and then I can’t make Wayne Gretzky’s head bleed, Doug can’t make Wayne Gretzky’s head bleed. And we’re shooting this for a couple of hours and we can’t do it. So we called up Jon in the middle of the night, it’s like one in the morning, and he comes over and he can’t do it. And finally we had to call Vince and get Vince over there at two in the morning. Four and a half hours after we started, he gets Wayne Gretzky’s head to bleed.

One of the reasons this film became such a huge cult classic on video is that it truly captured the midset of young men, particuarly men in their twenties. It was about chasing girls, cool night spots, slick clothes, video games, gambling in Vegas and so much more. The road trip to Vegas was another critical part of the movie. These were not the kind of guys that be happy to play bingo of course. They wanted action in Las Vegas, even if they were broke and some of them were clueless about the basics of blackjack, which led to another classic scene in the film.

But for many guys, even those who aren’t gamers, the Gretsky video game scene is still one of the most memorable in the film.

Gamers are More Divided Than Ever…And That’s a Good Thing

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Become enthralled by one thing long enough and regardless of whatever the thing itself may be, the same set of questions tends to present themselves when you began to look back on it.

While the questions are too varied to cover in full, a host of them will inevitably concern comparing that thing as it once was, to how the thing is now. When doing so it’s often essential to use your experience to properly separate the past as it actually occurred, and the past as you perceive it through the eyes of nostalgia.

That’s a distinction that’s been running through my mind recently as I look at how games have changed from both the day one origins of the medium, and from my personal start as a gamer, to where they are now. In doing so, it’s interesting to discover and distinguish the things that have actually changed, as opposed to the things that you heart tells you are different.

Specifically, lately I’ve been wondering if the gaming community really is more hostile to each other and divided than it has been ever before.

My heart tells me the answer is yes. After all, it seemed like the cultural divide among gamers when I was young didn’t extend far past Sega v.s. Nintendo. Now, though, we have issues like AAA v.s. indies, Digital Rights Management, the treatment of women in video games, the validity of YouTube gaming as a career, the ethics of micro-transactions, gaming as art, and many, many, more. All of those issues cause a nigh infinite series of divides among the gamers of the world, and that’s before you even get into the traditional Xbox, PS4, Wii U, and PC debates.

The question then is, are we really more divided as a gaming community than ever before? Is there really more of a hostile environment between gamers everywhere than there was back in the old days? Or instead, has this always been the case and its only the rapid speed the internet carries information and opinions at from all corners that causes the perception that there is more arguments than ever before?

Even when you approach that topic from an unbiased perspective, the answer will almost always be yes. Gamers are more divided and hostile than ever. The once popular idea of a community of gamers united against the rest of the world’s upturned noses at the very idea of gaming, has given way to a civil war with infighting on nearly every front. While you could argue if the embodiment of a gaming community with an “us against the world” mentality ever did truly exist at all, there’s little doubt that certainly isn’t the case now.

And you know what? In many ways we’re better off this way.

Well…Most of the Time Anyway

Oh sure from time to time I see a topic or viewpoint that I personally consider to be outlandish get very heated, and want to cite the always popular (yet rarely practical) “Can’t we all just get along?” belief, but for the most part I’ve come to accept the constant presence of various heated debates to be a good thing for gaming, and not a detriment.

The reason being is that complacency in any industry is never a good thing. No matter what else you can say against the average gamer, one this that’s for sure is that they are not a complacent lot. Not only are they quick to turn against something the moment it becomes a little too commonplace and comfortable, but they are always seeking out and confronting hot button issues without much in the way of fear hindering them. These may not always lead to the most sophisticated and intelligent debates mind you, but they are debates nonetheless.

It’s that constant stream of debate that ensures that developers, publishers, journalists, bloggers, websites, and anyone else on the creation side of the industry can never rest on their laurels. If there weren’t the dissension that exists on so many topics that we currently enjoy today, it’s possible that many of those in gaming wouldn’t feel the pressure (or even obligation) to create a variety of experiences that can cater to any number of personal tastes, preferences and beliefs.

There is a real passion behind many of the various viewpoints in the gaming world that is more and more leading to gamers from all walks of life getting creative and making something that perfectly represents their own particular set of thoughts. That not only serves as great entertainment for those that agree, but  fuel for those who do not to do the same and create something of their own in opposition.

Sure its a general attitude that doesn’t really lead to a perfect gaming world (and there are, perhaps, some topics we would be better off being unified on), but its never really been a perfect world has it? The one we have now, though where gaming is essentially forced to constantly mature, re-invent itself, and provide a variety of experiences precisely because the role and image of a gamer is no longer a caricature, but rather a group of  increasingly outspoken and discerning individuals is a pretty damn exciting one to live in, at least in lieu of perfection.

If there is one warning that all divided gamers need to heed though, its that we should all be careful to remember that at the end of the day, games are first and foremost meant for enjoyment and to be experienced. In that regard, it’s important to never be afraid to challenge your own views by actively seeking a variety of games in order to ensure that your beliefs (whatever they may be, on whatever topic or whatever style) are ones formed by trying all of the different experiences that games have to offer, and not limit yourself at all times to those that only serve your particular notions, thus undoing all of the good the current sometimes hostile and divided culture we enjoy as gamers is actually doing.

Is there a certain appeal to a utopian world where gamers come together to form a “Pleasantville” like community based on shared essential beliefs? Perhaps. But there’s also an appeal in a more gotham like gaming community where hostility and divided beliefs may rule the day, but they ultimately come together to form an impressive world that can only be forged from the fires of such a variety of passions.

Whether that’s your idea gaming world or not, it’s time we all stood back and appreciated the beauty and quality that world can so often lead to.

Five Goals Gaming Still Has Left to Pursue

As we approach 2014, it’s hard to not feel proud of the gaming industry and how far it’s come. Every year it seems that gaming is knocking down pre-conceived limitations, and defying the expectations of naysayers who thought that certain gaming accomplishments would never be realized.

That being said, though, its important to remember that there is always more ground to cover. While everyone’s personal industry wide wishlists for the future are sure to vary wildly, here are five goals both minor and major that I feel that gaming as a whole still has left to achieve.

Establish a True Comedy Genre

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Comedy, as a genre, has been around for essentially as long as the act of storytelling has. While it rarely gets the same level of critical or artistic praise that drama does, anyone who knows even the basics of storytelling knows that the two have a yin and yang relationship where the absence of one tends to throw the other out of balance.

Gaming’s relationship with comedy is somewhat less traditional. While there have been funny games before, and there have been plenty of funny moments in video games, there isn’t really a recognized independent comedy genre in gaming, as there isn’t really a steady enough stream of pure comedy game to justify its existence.

While you can’t fairly make a blanket statement on why that is, in general I feel that the underlying issue is similar to the one that faces the pure horror genre. By that I mean that there is a growing feeling among major publishers that comedy games aren’t viable financial investments. In the increasingly more expensive world of AAA game design, that’s pretty much the kiss of death.

It’s also an incredible shame as comedy is one of the most essential aspects of any entertainment medium, and gaming seems to be trending in a way that is discouraging the pursuit of it as a primary concept more and more. While modern titles like “The Stanley Parable,” give hope that indie developers may give new life to the creative pursuit of this idea, should that prove to not be the case then you have to consider gaming’s inability to really establish a true recognized comedy genre to be among the industry’s more notable failures.

Make Sports Announcers Sound Human

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Man, this one just irks me.

We’ve come a long, long way in the world of gaming technology to the point that the law of diminishing returns is becoming a more and more popular citation when addressing the subject. Yet despite those innovations, modern sports game announcers still sound like a group of particularly antisocial robot reading lines off the sweaty palms of someone just barely in their range of sight.

I understand that as many sports announcers are pre-recorded personalities its incredibly difficult for them to account for the many variables that can occur during a typical game. However, you can’t convince me that the quality of video game sports announcers today is the apex of the technology.

What’s really needed is greater incorporation of  some dynamic commentary elements. For instance, if my quarterback in “Madden” is having a bad year and throws another interception, it’d be nice to hear the announcers mention a potential QB controversy brewing. Similarly, if a QB is in a contract year and putting up career numbers, there should be some acknowledgment of the situation.

Regardless of the specifics, the general idea is that announcers need to start occasionally sounding like human beings. Some games are better than others (the WWE games are a great example of video game announcers at their worst), but in general this is a flaw that has plagued gaming for far too long.

Mature the Incorporation of Sex In Games

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See, gaming has actually done historically well with the subjects of romance and relationships over the years. However, once things start to go beyond a platonic level, the quality of the subject gets more and more murky.

Historically speaking many games have either treated the subject of sex with the maturity of a particularly horny teenage male, or with the prudishness of a wasp couple. There haven’t really been many attempts to incorporate sex into a game (even one that would seem to naturally include it) in a way that feels organic.

It’s a bit of an embarrassment, honestly. There is still an unfortunate perception amongst the casual observer regarding the maturity and social skills of the average gamer, and the fact that there haven’t been many titles that handle such a basic topic in a mature, non-exploitative, yet still entertaining way does that image no favors.

Now, I could be wrong on this matter and there could be some game, or games, out there that actually covers sex in a way similar to what I’ve described. However, even if that is the case, the absence of that approach as a standard is the larger issue as it concerns gaming and sex.

Create or Discover the “Citizen Kane” of Gaming

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I’m hesitant to include this entry because of the vague nature of the entire idea behind it. However, since this is among the most popular topics of discussion as it concerns the advancement of gaming, I’ll play devil’s advocate and give it a shot.

The basic idea behind the “Citizen Kane” of video games is that a game will come along that will make the average game fan (and society at large) recognize games as a legitimate potential art form, in the same way that “Citizen Kane” is recognized as the film that helped movies get established as a legitimate potential art form.

It’s a fundamentally faulty notion, but the spirit of the idea does have an air of truth to it. The average person doesn’t typically view gaming as an art form, and elements of gaming in mass media coverage tend to be about gaming controversies, or are otherwise cheap and insulting attention grabbers like the VGX awards, which actively harm the idea that there is a higher calling in gaming as a potential art form among more casual, or even indifferent, users.

Of course, what people tend to forget is that “Citizen Kane” was not an overnight game changer for many. Instead it would only fulfill that role in hindsight after a flood of ambitious, artistic, and financially successful titles that were directly influenced by it would make “Citizen Kane” the generally accepted turning point.

So perhaps instead the question of whether of not gaming will get its “Citizen Kane” shouldn’t just be a lookout for an individual release on the horizon, but a careful examination of the past to see if it’s already been released.

Improve the Current Video Game Property and Licensing System, or Create a New One

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Have you ever wondered why a certain favorite game has never seen a sequel, or why that original game no longer seems to be available for digital download? Well it could honestly be for any number of reasons, but more often than not the problem is one of licensing.

Gaming has long had serious issues with property licensing. While this is sometimes tied into the inclusion of a third party property (like the one that faced “The Simpsons” Konami games), there are a disturbing amount of completely independent properties that are handcuffed by archaic, or even non-existent, laws.

The entire system regarding property video game rights and license acquisition is one of the most convoluted and mysterious in all of entertainment. While many might think it’s a simple matter of contacting the right party and offering the right figure, the truth is rarely so simple.

Good Old Games shed some light on this issue earlier in the year when they revealed that the process to acquire “System Shock 2” for digital distribution took years of concentrated effort, most of which involved navigating a system shrouded in confusion where even the people who were the right ones to contact, didn’t know they were the ones who should be contacted. During the course of their lengthy legal battles they were often working without a net, as precedent for such an effort is almost non-existent.

In some cases, the situation surrounding property rights of games would be hilarious if they weren’t so sad. For example, the popular “No One Lives Forever” series has long been unavailable to modern users due to the simple fact that no one knows who has the rights to it, even among the small group of people that potentially could. In other words, under the current system, entire game licenses can be lost as easy as a set of car keys.

It’s an embarrassing mess of bureaucracy and incompetence. Recent years have seen some major improvements in this area, but unless a concise and through overhaul of this entire system is undergone, we run the risk of making a sizable part of gaming history inaccessible.

“South Park: Stick of Truth” Gets Approved in Australia Thanks to Some Creative Censoring

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We may never know what exactly is up the collective butts of Australian video game censors, but that hilariously misinformed and outdated group of do gooders is at it again.

The target this time is “South Park: Stick of Truth.” Specifically the censors rejected the game on the basis of a scene involving penis shaped anal probes, and an abortion scene involving vacuums and a wire.

On a side note, isn’t it nice when game adaptations stay so true to the source material?

Anyway developer Obsidian tried re-submitting the game under some slightly toned down conditions, but were rejected at each turn. Finally they submitted an impressively sarcastic version of the probing scene where the image of the scene is replaced with a crying koala while on screen text informs you as to what is actually happening in the original scene.

Unsurprisingly, considering the board’s traditionally misinformed interpretation of comedy, this version was accepted.

So it looks like the fair Australian gamers of the world will get to play “Stick of Truth,” albeit with more static images of Koalas in place than were originally intended, as well as some minor mini-games axed entirely, thanks to some creative skirting of the censors.

Seriously though, what is the logic behind the extreme censorship of gaming in Australia? Considering it’s the year 2013 and I can probably pull up a YouTube video of mass genocides set to a dubstep soundtrack and intercut with images of “My Little Pony” fan porn on my phone, does a cartoon video game character’s anal probe encounter really constitute the ultimate line of morality?

Now That Nintendo is Making Crossovers, Here Are Six That I Would Like to See

Thoughts on the recently announced “Dynasty Warriors” and “Legend of Zelda” crossover “Hyrule Warriors” seem to range from OMG to FML all over the internet, and among the incredibly insane Nintendo hardcore fanbase.

Personally I think it’s about time that Nintendo starting merging their established properties with other incredibly random, yet oddly appropriate, gaming franchises. In fact, as long as the door to the entire concept is kicked in now and anarchy reigns, I can think of  at least six lazily titled Nintendo crossovers I’d like to see.

Bushido Emblem (Fire Emblem/Bushido Blade)

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If it weren’t already established that life isn’t fair, I would eternally wonder why the “Bushido Blade” series has not seen a proper follow up in years. A truly original entrant into the fighter genre that’s capable of effortlessly producing intense match ups, “Bushido Blade” revolves around a combat system where one hit can end it all. Think “Dive Kick” with more strategy.

The “Fire Emblem” series diverse cast of characters and their appropriately large arsenal of weapons would actually fit nicely into “Bushido’s” mechanics. For that matter, so would “Emblem’s” consistently well done art style and the fact its characters are used to dying quick and unheroic deaths (at least when I play it).

Also…oh screw it I just want a new “Bushido Blade” game. It can take place in “Pokemon’s” world for all I care. Get on it Nintendo.

PokeSpore (Pokemon/Spore)

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Of course since “Bushidomon” isn’t likely even by the new Nintendo crossover standards, maybe they could blend the famous monster catching series with the 2008 “could have been way better” PC classic “Spore.”

It’s a natural merger really. In “PokeSpore” you could design a world full of Pokemon, and watch them evolve and become prized by Pokemasters everywhere. Plus Nintendo could just scrounge “PokeSpore” player’s games to tap into a nigh infinite free source of increasingly uninspired “Pokemon” designs.

That’s a win-win people.

Silent Crossing (Silent Hill/Animal Crossing)

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Anyone can get lost in the world of “Animal Crossing.” Besides being filled with a seemingly endless amount of activities and interior design possibilities, it’s lighthearted cartoonish nature makes for a very inviting setting that can make a 100 hours pass by in what feels like minutes.

However the real question is, can the “Animal Crossing” gameplay survive a trip to a more undesirable locale like “Silent Hill?”

The answer, of course, is shit yeah it can. In “Silent Crossing” you’ll play the new mayor of “Silent Hill” and are tasked with keeping up the town and interacting with its eternally tortured denizens, as well as redecorating the world to reflect the unique psychological horrors of its next outside visitor.

The Binding of Icarus (Kid Icarus/The Binding of Issac)

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Look, most of the ideas on this are poorly conceived and lazily written jokes. A rouge-like “Kid Icarus,” though, is no joke. It would just kick ass.

After all, the original “Kid Icarus” was an insanely tough game that might as well of had perma-death in place, and even featured an upgrade and item system that’s not too out of place from the average rouge-like. Combine that with the diverse mythical elements of the Icarus series, and this isn’t hard to see as a highly entertaining possibility.

In any case a rouge-like is a more logical genre for the series to merge with than a 3D shooter was.

League of Smash (League of Legends/Super Smash Bros.)

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Blitzcrank, Ahri, and Darius? Never heard of them. You want real heroes you’ve got to look at Link, Mario, and to a lesser extent Luigi. You’ve got to look at the “Smash Bros.” roster.

In “League of Smash” you would choose a team of classic Nintendo heroes with their own unique attributes and abilities, and pit them against an opposing team of Nintendo heroes in a MOBA setting. Minions are Pikmin, worlds are based on classic Nintendo environments, and…

Huh. Maybe it’s my 8 A.M bourbon and bourbon (that’s bourbon mixed with bourbon) kicking in, but that actually sounds like something I would buy the hell out of.

Mushroom Kingdom Hearts        (Nintendo/Kingdom Hearts)

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Let’s be honest. At the end of the day crossovers are built on the philosophy of combining two or more popular properties to appeal to a wider, established demographic. Following that logic, the combination of Nintendo, Disney, and “Final Fantasy” would have to be considered the alpha crossover.

It doesn’t even come close to mattering what the actual game plays like. This thing could make so much money that it would completely undo the order and structure of the global economy.